Fall 2021

Introductory Unit

SEPTEMBER 6 – SEPTEMBER 22

Unit 1: Confucianism

SEPTEMBER 27 – OCTOBER 10

Unit 2: Aristotle

OCTOBER 11 – OCTOBER 27

Unit 3: Daoism

NOVEMBER 1 – NOVEMBER 14

Unit 4: Stoicism

NOVEMBER 15 – NOVEMBER 28

Concluding Unit

NOVEMBER 29 – DECEMBER 8

Other Upcoming Events

SEPTEMBER 14 – DECEMBER 12:

“The Language in Common,” Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery: a group exhibition presenting artistic practices that site language in the space between poetry, visual art, and their performance

SEPTEMBER 21, OCTOBER 11, NOVEMBER 9:

“Pachaysana Unlearning Series,” online over Zoomseries of workshops and webinars on issues surrounding epistemic justice

SEPTEMBER 29 – DECEMBER 10:

25th Anniversary of the College of East Asian Studies Japanese Garden (Shôyôan Teien), Mansfield Freeman Center Gallery: an exhibition featuring archival photographs, poetry, photography, video, and installations that demonstrate the breadth of the garden’s cultural connections over the last two and a half decades

OCTOBER 7, 12:00–1:00pm:

CEAS Open House, Shapiro Writing Center Patio: come learn about the College of East Asian Studies major and minor

OCTOBER 14, 12:00–1:00pm:

Classics and Archaeology Open HouseHogwarts Tent: come learn about majoring in Classics and Archaeology, get a free lunch!

OCTOBER 14, 12:00–1:00pm:

“The Dawn of Japan & US Relations,” Fisk 201: a talk by Setsuo Ohmori, the Consul General of Japan in Boston, and the top diplomatic representative of Japan for the New England region

OCTOBER 20, 7:00pm:

Human Rights in Afghanistan and Pakistan, Usdan 108: a panel discussion on Global Responsibilities, Gender Rights, and Regional Realities

NOVEMBER 2, 6:00am–8:00pm:

Election DayBeckham Hall: get out and vote!

NOVEMBER 3, 12:00–1:00pm:

Philosophy Department Open HouseLabyrinth Tent: come learn about majoring in philosophy, get a free lunch!

NOVEMBER 4, 12:00–1:00pm:

COL Open HouseLabyrinth Tent: come learn about majoring in the College of Letters, get a free lunch!

"The only critique of a philosophy that is possible and that proves something, namely trying to see whether one can live in accordance with it, has never been taught at universities: all that has ever been taught is a critique of words by means of other words." – Friedrich Nietzsche, Untimely Meditations